Calls for Proposals

 

Improving Undergraduate Science Education: Education and Human Resources - Development and Implementation - Engaged Student Learning

"IUSE: EHR supports a broad range of projects, including: research and development of innovative learning resources; studies to understand the impact of such resources; strategies to implement effective instruction in a department or multiple departments, within or across institutions; faculty development projects; design and testing of instruments for measuring student outcomes; and proposals for untested and unconventional activities that could have a high impact on STEM teaching and learning. Included among such projects are workshops and conferences that explore revolutionary ideas to improve undergraduate STEM education, proposals to increase the diversity of the institutions and faculty participating in the IUSE: EHR enterprise, and efforts involving collaborations of education researchers and discipline scientists. This range of projects ensure that undergraduate STEM education benefits simultaneously from cutting-edge discipline-based STEM research, educational research and a healthy interaction of STEM practitioners and education researchers. In planning a project and building the research team, proposers are reminded that the expectation for proposals submitted in response to the IUSE-EHR solicitation is that there will be new knowledge generated through an educational research study that poses one or more significant questions and uses a research design that permits direct investigation of the questions. Indeed, through all of its projects, the IUSE: EHR program recognizes and respects the variety of discipline-specific challenges and opportunities facing STEM faculty as they strive to incorporate results from educational research into classroom practice while working with education research colleagues and social science learning scholars to advance knowledge and adoption of evidence-based teaching and learning practices. Results and findings of IUSE: EHR projects, in turn, contribute to NSF's and EHR's larger themes that focus attention on STEM workforce development, STEM literacy across the population, and increasing participation and persistence in STEM, especially by members of underrepresented groups.

Toward these ends the program features two tracks: (1) Engaged Student Learning and (2) Institutional and Community Transformation. Two tiers of projects exist within each track: (i) Exploration and Design and (ii) Development and Implementation.

  • Development and Implementation projects are larger-scale efforts that also may fall within either the Engaged Student Learning or Institutional and Community Transformation tracks. These projects may focus on new or promising interventions or strategies to achieve well-specified STEM learning objectives, including making refinements on the basis of small-scale testing. __
  • Institutional and Community Transformation This track supports projects that use innovative approaches to increase the use of highly effective, evidence-based STEM teaching and learning, curricular, and co-curricular practices in institutions of higher education or across/within disciplinary communities. These projects may be proposed by an institution or set of institutions; alternatively, community proposals may be submitted through professional communities, including discipline-based professional societies and networks or organizations that represent institutions of higher education. Projects are expected to be both evidence-based and knowledge-generating. Competitive proposals pertaining to institutional and community transformation will include a description of the theory of change that is guiding the work proposed and will test hypotheses about transforming undergraduate teaching and learning in STEM by examining the impact of deliberate processes of change. Useful theories of change typically include a description of the problem or a plan to develop information about the problem to be addressed; the goals to be achieved by the proposed project; the processes, interventions, or strategies that will enable the proposing institution or community to meet these goals; a rationale for why these processes are likely to enable the achievement of the stated goals; and indication of how the proposer will assess whether the goals have been met. It is expected that, in presenting a theory of change, proposals will be informed by research literature and theoretical perspectives concerning change that are relevant to the goals and context presented in the proposal."

Due: December 11, 2018

Improving Undergraduate Science Education: Education and Human Resources - Development and Implementation - Institutional and Community Transformation

"IUSE: EHR supports a broad range of projects, including: research and development of innovative learning resources; studies to understand the impact of such resources; strategies to implement effective instruction in a department or multiple departments, within or across institutions; faculty development projects; design and testing of instruments for measuring student outcomes; and proposals for untested and unconventional activities that could have a high impact on STEM teaching and learning. Included among such projects are workshops and conferences that explore revolutionary ideas to improve undergraduate STEM education, proposals to increase the diversity of the institutions and faculty participating in the IUSE: EHR enterprise, and efforts involving collaborations of education researchers and discipline scientists. This range of projects ensure that undergraduate STEM education benefits simultaneously from cutting-edge discipline-based STEM research, educational research and a healthy interaction of STEM practitioners and education researchers. In planning a project and building the research team, proposers are reminded that the expectation for proposals submitted in response to the IUSE-EHR solicitation is that there will be new knowledge generated through an educational research study that poses one or more significant questions and uses a research design that permits direct investigation of the questions. Indeed, through all of its projects, the IUSE: EHR program recognizes and respects the variety of discipline-specific challenges and opportunities facing STEM faculty as they strive to incorporate results from educational research into classroom practice while working with education research colleagues and social science learning scholars to advance knowledge and adoption of evidence-based teaching and learning practices. Results and findings of IUSE: EHR projects, in turn, contribute to NSF's and EHR's larger themes that focus attention on STEM workforce development, STEM literacy across the population, and increasing participation and persistence in STEM, especially by members of underrepresented groups.

Toward these ends the program features two tracks: (1) Engaged Student Learning and (2) Institutional and Community Transformation. Two tiers of projects exist within each track: (i) Exploration and Design and (ii) Development and Implementation.

  • Development and Implementation projects are larger-scale efforts that also may fall within either the Engaged Student Learning or Institutional and Community Transformation tracks. These projects may focus on new or promising interventions or strategies to achieve well-specified STEM learning objectives, including making refinements on the basis of small-scale testing. __
  • Institutional and Community Transformation This track supports projects that use innovative approaches to increase the use of highly effective, evidence-based STEM teaching and learning, curricular, and co-curricular practices in institutions of higher education or across/within disciplinary communities. These projects may be proposed by an institution or set of institutions; alternatively, community proposals may be submitted through professional communities, including discipline-based professional societies and networks or organizations that represent institutions of higher education. Projects are expected to be both evidence-based and knowledge-generating. Competitive proposals pertaining to institutional and community transformation will include a description of the theory of change that is guiding the work proposed and will test hypotheses about transforming undergraduate teaching and learning in STEM by examining the impact of deliberate processes of change. Useful theories of change typically include a description of the problem or a plan to develop information about the problem to be addressed; the goals to be achieved by the proposed project; the processes, interventions, or strategies that will enable the proposing institution or community to meet these goals; a rationale for why these processes are likely to enable the achievement of the stated goals; and indication of how the proposer will assess whether the goals have been met. It is expected that, in presenting a theory of change, proposals will be informed by research literature and theoretical perspectives concerning change that are relevant to the goals and context presented in the proposal."

Due: December 11, 2018

Health-professional Education Partnership Initiative

"The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research education activities in the mission areas of the NIH. The over-arching goal of this Fogarty International Center R25 program is to support educational activities that complement and/or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nations biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs by enhancing health workforce capacity in high HIV-burden, low-income countriesin sub-Saharan Africa; enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral and clinical research workforce by encouraging interprofessional education initiatives to enhance team health care delivery; help recruit individuals with specific specialty or disciplinary backgrounds to research careers in biomedical, behavioral and clinical sciences in low-income countries to enhance capacity of US research projects; foster a better understanding of biomedical, behavioral and clinical research and its implications to improve capacity to develop, implement and evaluate evidence-based health services. To accomplish the stated over-arching goal, this FOA will support creative educational activities with a primary focus on courses for Skills Development;Research training; Mentoring Activities; Curriculum or Methods Development to increase Outreach to broad communities to enhance participation in skills development courses, curricula, and mentoring activities."

Due: December 13, 2018

Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate

“The Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP) program seeks to advance knowledge about models to improve pathways to the professoriate and success for historically underrepresented minority doctoral students, postdoctoral fellows and faculty, particularly African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and Native Pacific Islanders, in specific STEM disciplines and/or STEM education research fields.”

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: December 14, 2018

Nathan Cummings Foundation 2019 Fellowship Program

"NCF looks for Fellows whose work reflects our focus on climate change and inequality. Fellowship projects should align with at least one of the Foundation’s four focus areas, which together form an integrated framework for our work to advance a healthy planet and democracy: Inclusive Clean Economy; Racial and Economic Justice; Corporate and Political Accountability; and Voice, Creativity and Culture

Exceptional Fellowship applications will explain how the potential Fellow will work to push NCF beyond its boundaries by opening productive new lines of inquiry, asking provocative questions, and developing new ideas, approaches and strategies to solve the climate crisis and end inequality."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: December 14, 2018

Rising Tide Foundation Social & Educational Programs

"Supports projects that address the following areas:
- Scholarship programs for gifted students, targeting key talents with high potential to succeed professionally but limited means to access world-class academic institutions. 
- Skills training programs for disadvantaged but highly motivated, resilient and self-reliant individuals who are looking to become self-sustaining."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: Decmber 15, 2018

Latham Foundation for the Promotion of Humane Education

"Edith and Milton Latham founded the Latham Foundation for the Promotion of Humane Education in 1918 to teach kindness and respect for all living things. Since then we have seen many changes in society but Latham continues to promote humane education as a core value that has a positive and effective impact on society. In our view, respect means taking personal responsibility for making good decisions within one’s own community rather than advocating any one particular dietary, political, environmental, or religious view—and respecting others’ right to do the same.

Humane education’s message of kindness and respect is open to all who will learn and apply these principles in their own lives and communities. Therefore, while requests from nonprofit organizations will have priority, all are welcome to apply.

We encourage applicants to review the hierarchy of humane education that our Latham Steps memorialize and show how their proposal supports these principles....

There are two main categories of funding

  • Humane Education Outreach Programs
  • Research on the Efficacy of Humane Education

We will award grants for either one or two years. Receiving a grant does not guarantee a renewal, nor does it prohibit one.

Awards will be from $5,000 – $10,000 for a one-year grant and up to $15,000 for a two-year grant.

Latham cautions applicants about applying for funds for salaries, as we do not guarantee grants continuing past the initial grant period."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: December 28, 2018

Oberkotter Foundation Grants for Listening and Spoken Language

"The Oberkotter Foundation funds programs that promote listening and spoken language for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. The Foundation seeks to address the needs, gaps, and barriers families face in locating and accessing information and services in their community. "

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: December 31, 2018

Beckman Center for the History of Chemistry 80/20 Postdoctoral Fellowships

"The Beckman Center offers fellowships on an annual cycle for scholars doing research in the history and social studies of chemistry and related sciences, technologies, and industries. Fellows are expected to participate in biweekly informal writing groups and give at least one lunchtime lecture. They also have the opportunity to take part in a variety of outreach activities while in residence at the Institute. About 20 fellowships are given out annually, making the Beckman Center the largest private fellowship program in the history of science in the United States"

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: January 2, 2019

American Psychological Association Jacquelin Goldman Congressional Fellowship

"To provide developmental and clinical psychologists with an interest in policies that affect the psychological development of children with an invaluable public policy learning experience; to contribute to the more effective use of psychological knowledge in government; and to broaden awareness about the value of psychology-government interaction among psychologists and within the federal government.

Through a generous bequest to the American Psychological Foundation from Jacquelin Goldman, PhD, APA administers this APF-funded program for a congressional fellow with an interest in policies that affect the psychological development of children. Applicants for this fellowship must have a background in developmental or clinical psychology and experience working directly with children. Fellowship activities may involve drafting legislation, conducting oversight work, assisting with congressional hearings and events, and preparing briefs and speeches. Fellows also attend a two-week orientation program on congressional and executive branch operations, which provides guidance for the congressional placement process, and participate in a yearlong seminar series on science and public policy issues. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) administers these professional development activities for the APA fellows and for fellows sponsored by over two dozen other professional societies.

APF will sponsor up to one Jacquelin Goldman Congressional Fellow for a one-year appointment beginning Sept. 1, 2019. The Fellowship stipend ranges from $75,000 to $90,000, depending upon years of post-doctoral experience. In addition, the Fellowship provides reimbursement for health insurance coverage and a $3,750 stipend for professional development and relocation expenses during the fellowship year. Final selection of Fellows will be made in early spring of 2019."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: January 6, 2019

William T. Grant Foundation Research Grants

"We fund research that increases understanding in one of our two focus areas: (1) programs, policies, and practices that reduce inequality in youth outcomes, and (2) strategies to improve the use of research evidence in ways that benefit youth. We seek research that builds stronger theory and empirical evidence in these two areas.

Research grants about reducing inequality typically range between $100,000 and $600,000 and cover two to three years of support. Research grants about improving the use of research initiative will range between $100,000 and $1,000,000 and cover two to four years of support. "

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: January 9, 2019

Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

"Digital Humanities Advancement Grants (DHAG) support digital projects at different stages throughout their lifecycles, from early start-up phases through implementation and sustainability. Experimentation, reuse, and extensibility are hallmarks of this program, leading to innovative work that can scale to enhance scholarly research, teaching, and public programming in the humanities...

Through a special partnership with NEH and pending the availability of appropriated funds, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) anticipates providing additional funding to this program to encourage innovative collaborations between museum or library professionals and humanities professionals to advance preservation of, access to, use of, and engagement with digital collections and services. IMLS and NEH may jointly fund some DHAG projects that involve collaborations with museums and/or libraries.

Digital Humanities Advancement Grants may involve

  • creating or enhancing experimental, computationally-based methods, techniques, or infrastructure that contribute to the humanities;
  • pursuing scholarship that examines the history, criticism, and philosophy of digital culture and its impact on society; or
  • conducting evaluative studies that investigate the practices and the impact of digital scholarship on research, pedagogy, scholarly communication, and public engagement."

Due: January 15, 2019

The Science of Learning

"The Science of Learning program supports potentially transformative basic research to advance the science of learning. The goals of the SL Program are to develop basic theoretical insights and fundamental knowledge about learning principles, processes and constraints. Projects that are integrative and/or interdisciplinary may be especially valuable in moving basic understanding of learning forward but research with a single discipline or methodology is also appropriate if it addresses basic scientific questions in learning.   The possibility of developing connections between proposed research and specific scientific, technological, educational, and workforce challenges will be considered as valuable broader impacts, but are not necessarily central to the intellectual merit of proposed research. The program will support  research addressing learning in a wide range of domains at one or more levels of analysis including: molecular/cellular mechanisms; brain systems; cognitive affective, and behavioral processes; and social/cultural influences. The program supports a variety of methods including: experiments, field studies, surveys, secondary-data analyses, and modeling."

Due: January 16, 2019

Research Coordination Networks in Undergraduate Biology Education

“The goal of the RCN program is to advance a field or create new directions in research or education by supporting groups of investigators to communicate and coordinate their research, training, and educational activities across disciplinary, organizational, geographic, and international boundaries.”

Due: January 22, 2019

Spencer Small Research Grant

“The Small Research Grants program is intended to support education research projects with budgets of $50,000 or less. In keeping with the Spencer Foundation’s mission, this program aims to fund academic work that will contribute to the improvement of education, broadly conceived.”

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: January 22, 2019

Short Courses on Innovative Methodologies and Approaches in the Behavioral and Social Sciences

"The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research education activities in the mission areas of the NIH. The over-arching goal of this OBSSR and participating institutes and centers R25 program is to support educational activities that develop cross-cutting methodologies and analytics that are needed to more rapidly advance behavioral and social sciences research (BSSR) and are not already well addressed by existing educational programs widely available to the research community. Methodological domains of focus include but are not limited to innovative data collection methodologies and analytic techniques, analysis and linking of big data, or needed but underused designs to advance research across the translational spectrum. Priority will be given to courses that address an important and cross-cutting educational need, that fill a gap in the field not already well addressed by other opportunities and that include a plan for increased reach and sustainability of the training both during and beyond the funding period. Over the period of support, it is expected that the course will be refined, improved, and sufficiently well-documented and resourced for dissemination of the program when the period of support ends. To accomplish the stated over-arching goal, this FOA will support creative educational activities with a primary focus on Courses for Skills Development"

Due: January 24, 2019

Project to Develop and Distribute High School Curricula Materials that Reflect the Redefinition of the International System of Units (SI)

"NIST is offering a grant of up to $200,000 for the development, production and distribution of science and/or mathematics curricula resources for high school classrooms that reflect the upcoming redefinition of units within the international system of measurement (also called the SI or the metric system). "

Due: January 28, 2019

Caplan Foundation for Early Childhood Early Childhood Research Grants

"The Caplan Foundation for Early Childhood is an incubator of promising research and development projects that appear likely to improve the welfare of young children, from infancy through 7 years, in the United States. Welfare is broadly defined to include physical and mental health, safety, nutrition, education, play, familial support, acculturation, societal integration and childcare. Grants are only made if a successful project outcome will likely be of significant interest to other professionals, within the grantee’s field of endeavor, and would have a direct benefit and potential national application. The Foundation’s goal is to provide seed money to implement those imaginative proposals that exhibit the greatest chance of improving the lives of young children, on a national scale."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: January 30, 2019

Washington Center for Equitable Growth Academic Research Grants

"The Washington Center for Equitable Growth seeks to deepen our understanding of whether and how inequality affects economic growth and stability. Our academic grants program is building a portfolio of cutting-edge scholarly research investigating the various channels through which economic inequality may or may not impact economic growth and stability, both directly and indirectly. We are currently requesting proposals in the four core areas of interest outlined above: macroeconomic policy; market structure; the labor market; and human capital. We will accept proposals on other topics that are directly related to inequality and growth."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: January 31, 2019

Center for Retirement Research Steven H. Sandell Grant Program

"The Center for Retirement Research sponsors the annual Steven H. Sandell Grant Program for scholars in the field of retirement or disability research and policy. The program is funded by the U.S. Social Security Administration to provide opportunities for junior or non-tenured scholars from all academic disciplines to pursue cutting-edge projects on retirement or disability issues. Research focal areas include:
       - Disability incidence in the population
       - Labor force participation
       - Measuring sources of retirement income and adequacy
       - Informing SSA projections
       - Effects of SSA communications on worker/beneficiary behavior
       - Program interactions with the Affordable Care Act
       - State and local government pensions
       - The vocational grid for determining disability insurance"

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: January 31, 2019

Spencer Foundation - Small Research Grants

"The Small Research Grants program is intended to support education research projects with budgets of $50,000 or less. In keeping with the Spencer Foundations mission, this program aims to fund academic work that will contribute to the improvement of education, broadly conceived."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: February 1, 2019

Reser Family Foundation Grant

"The Reser Family Foundation offers two Grant Programs: Fast Track Grant Program for requests under $12,500. This process is designed to provide streamlined access and support to organizations using a one-step application.

The Reser Family Foundation Grant Program for requests from $12,500 to $50,000. This is a two stage grant process that starts with an organization submitting a Grant Request (LOI) on-line. After a review, approved organizations are invited to provide a full grant proposal. A site visit may be scheduled during the process.

The Reser Family Foundation has identified four Cornerstones to guide giving, based on our desire to strengthen Oregonians:

  • Education
  • Health
  • The Arts
  • Environment Impact Areas

We also identified Impact Areas within each Cornerstone to provide guidance to partner applicants related to the types of grants we generally support. Our Impact Areas help identify our current funding priorities.

Education

  1. Supporting school-day academic and transitional programs that encourage student success.
  2. Providing after-school enrichment and support for extracurricular activities in middle schools.
  3. Supporting the basic needs of students with limited economic means on their path to a high school diploma or GED.

A closer look at our funding in Education Funding Priorities: In-school programs in public schools or independent schools that serve children with special needs. Programs that support Career Technical Education (CTE) initiatives, first generation college students, and schools serving low-income youth. We are seeking grant requests that have clear letters of support, signed by the school administrator (e.g. Superintendent) if applicable..."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

LOI Due: February 1, 2019

National Science Foundation Research Traineeship (NRT) Program

"The NSF Research Traineeship (NRT) program is designed to encourage the development and implementation of bold, new, and potentially transformative models for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) graduate education training. The NRT program seeks proposals that explore ways for graduate students in research-based master’s and doctoral degree programs to develop the skills, knowledge, and competencies needed to pursue a range of STEM careers. The program is dedicated to effective training of STEM graduate students in high priority interdisciplinary or convergent research areas, through the use of a comprehensive traineeship model that is innovative, evidence-based, and aligned with changing workforce and research needs."

Due: February 6, 2019

Training-based Workforce Development for Advanced Cyberinfrastructure

"This program seeks to prepare, nurture, and grow the national scientific research workforce for creating, utilizing, and supporting advanced cyberinfrastructure (CI) to enable and potentially transform fundamental science and engineering research and contribute to the Nation's overall economic competitiveness and security. The goals of this solicitation are to (i) ensure broad adoption of CI tools, methods, and resources by the research community in order to catalyze major research advances and to enhance researchers’ abilities to lead the development of new CI; and (ii) integrate core literacy and discipline-appropriate advanced skills in advanced CI as well as computational and data-driven science and engineering into the Nation’s educational curriculum/instructional material fabric spanning undergraduate and graduate courses for advancing fundamental research. Pilot and Implementation projects may target one or both of the solicitation goals, while Large-scale Project Conceptualization projects must address both goals. For the purpose of this solicitation, advanced CI is broadly defined as the set of resources, tools, methods, and services for advanced computation, large-scale data handling and analytics, and networking and security for large-scale systems that collectively enable potentially transformative fundamental research. This solicitation calls for innovative, scalable training, education, and curriculum/instructional materials—targeting one or both of the solicitation goals—to address the emerging needs and unresolved bottlenecks in scientific and engineering research workforce development, from the postsecondary level to active researchers. The funded activities, spanning targeted, multidisciplinary communities, will lead to transformative changes in the state of research workforce preparedness for advanced CI-enabled research in the short- and long-terms. As part of this investment, this solicitation also seeks to broaden CI access and adoption by (i) increasing or deepening accessibility of methods and resources of advanced CI and of computational and data-driven science and engineering by a wide range of scientific disciplines and institutions with lower levels of CI adoption to date; and (ii) harnessing the capabilities of larger segments of diverse underrepresented groups. Proposals from, and in partnership with, the aforementioned communities are especially encouraged. There are three project classes as defined below:

  • Pilot Projects: up to $300,000 total budget with durations up to two years;
  • Implementation Projects: Small (with total budgets of up to $500,000) or Medium (with total budgets of up to $1,000,000) for durations of up to four years; and
  • Large-scale Project Conceptualization Projects: up to $500,000 total budgets with durations up to 2 years.

Due: February 6, 2019

FY 2019 Community College Initiative Program

"The Office of Global Educational Programs of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) of the U.S. Department of State announces an open competition for the Community College Initiative (CCI) Program. ECA is seeking proposal submissions for one cooperative agreement to design, implement, and oversee the CCI Program. The CCI Program provides international participants from underserved and underrepresented communities with an intensive academic-year long program at accredited U.S. community colleges, focused on building technical and professional skills while deepening participants' understanding of the United States, its people and values."

Due: February 11, 2019

FY 2019 Study of the U.S. Institutes for Student Leaders

"The Study of the U. S. Branch (ECA/A/E/USS), Office of Academic Exchange Programs, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA), invites proposal submissions from U.S. public and private non-profit organizations and accredited U.S. post-secondary educational institutions (community colleges, liberal arts colleges, public and private universities) meeting the provisions described in Internal Revenue Code section 26 USC 501(c)(3) (see section C. Eligibility Information) to design and implement Study of the U.S. Institutes (SUSIs) for Student Leaders, pending the availability of FY 2019 funds. Applicants should propose to administer either option A: SUSIs for Student Leaders (Global) which includes seven Institutes, or option B: SUSIs for Student Leaders from Europe, which includes four Institutes."

Due: February 11, 2019

FY 2019 Study of the U.S. Institutes for Scholars

"The Study of the U. S. Branch (ECA/A/E/USS), Office of Academic Exchange Programs, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA), invites proposal submissions from accredited U.S. post-secondary education institutions (community colleges, liberal arts colleges, public and private universities) and other U.S. public and private non-profit organizations meeting the provisions described in Internal Revenue Code section 26 USC 501(c)(3) (see section C. Eligibility Information) to design and implement four (4) Study of the U.S. Institutes (SUSIs) for Scholars, pending the availability of FY 2019 funds.  
 
Each Study of the U.S. Institute will be six weeks in duration, including an approximately four-week academic residency at an academic institution and up to two weeks of an integrated educational study tour.  The academic residency should take place on a U.S. university or college campus and should include academic coursework, diverse speakers, time for personal research, and opportunities for interaction with American peers.  The study tour should take scholars to another region of the United States and it should complement the academic residency.  All programs should conclude in Washington D.C. with a stay of two to four days."

Due: February 11, 2019

University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities Education, Research and Service

"The Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) within the Administration for Community Living (ACL), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) forecasts the possible availability of Fiscal Year (FY) 2019 funds to make five-year grants to up to three entities designated as University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities Education, Research, and Service (UCEDD). These grantees carry out four core functions: (1) interdisciplinary pre-service preparation and continuing education of students; (2) community services, including training, technical assistance, and/or demonstration and model activities; (3) research; and (4) dissemination of information. UCEDDs are interdisciplinary education, research and public service units of universities, or public or not-for-profit entities associated with universities that implement the four core functions addressing, directly or indirectly, one or more of the areas of emphasis (e.g., quality assurance, education and early intervention, child care, health, employment, housing, transportation, recreation and other services available or offered to individuals in a community, including formal and informal community supports, that affect their quality of life). Funds made available under this proposed funding opportunity will be used to pay for the Federal share of the cost of the administration and operation of programs designated as UCEDDs."

Due February 23, 2019 11:49 pm ET

Science, Technology, Innovation, and Partnerships in Higher Education Program

“USAID has a long history of engaging higher education institutions (HEIs) to achieve development objectives. Together with HEIs, the U.S. Global Development Lab partners with USAID colleagues, other federal agencies, NGOs, and the private sector to increase the scientific knowledge and evidence directed toward addressing USAID’s development priorities and improving policy and programming decisions.”

Due: March 4, 2019

Institute of Education Sciences - Unsolicited Grant Opportunities

"The Institute of Education Sciences (the Institute) will consider unsolicited applications for research, evaluation, and statistics projects that would make significant contributions to the mission of the organization. Our mission is to expand fundamental knowledge and understanding of education and to provide parents, education leaders and practitioners, researchers, and the general public with unbiased, reliable, and useful information about the condition and progress of education in the United States; about education policies, programs, and practices that support learning, improve academic achievement, and increase access to education opportunities for all students; and about the effectiveness of Federal and other education programs. In addition, in order to incentivize researchers to meet higher standards for their work, we are developing Standards for Excellence in Education Research (SEER), which will reward several tiers of research quality. As appropriate to the type of project proposed and the status of SEER development at the time of application submission, we expect applicants to address as many SEER domains and questions as possible.

Under this announcement, we will consider applications for projects that are not eligible under our FY2019 grant competitions, both open and closed, described at https://ies.ed.gov/funding/. The applicant must demonstrate that the project was not eligible under one of our FY2019 grant competitions. In addition, we do not provide funds for projects that consist solely of program delivery or the provision of services to students. Activities supported by the Institute must be relevant to U.S. schools.

The National Center for Education Research did not hold the Research Training Programs in the Education Sciences competition (CFDA Number: 84.305B) in FY 2019, and we will not consider applications under this unsolicited announcement that in prior years would have been eligible under that competition.

We use a two-stage process to consider unsolicited grant applications. 1. If you are interested in this opportunity, submit a short prospectus. We will evaluate the prospectus to determine if it meets the eligibility requirements and if the proposed project would make a significant contribution to the organizations overall mission. 2. If we decide to consider the project further, you will submit a full proposal using the forms and format applicable to our regular research competitions. We will send the full proposal out for external peer review."

Due: March 6, 2019

Institute of Education Sciences (IES): Low-Cost, Short-Duration Evaluation of Education Interventions

"Purpose of Program: In awarding these grants, the Institute of Education Sciences (Institute) intends to provide national leadership in expanding fundamental knowledge and understanding of (1) developmental and school readiness outcomes for infants and toddlers with or at risk for a disability, (2) education outcomes for all students from early childhood education through postsecondary and adult education, and (3) employment and wage outcomes when relevant (such as for students who engaged in career and technical, postsecondary, or adult education). The Institute's research grant programs are designed to provide interested individuals and the general public with reliable and valid information about education practices that support learning and improve academic achievement and access to education opportunities for all students. These interested individuals include parents, educators, students, researchers, and policymakers. In carrying out its grant programs, the Institute provides support for programs of research in areas of demonstrated national need...

Under this competition, NCER will consider only applications that address low-cost, short-duration evaluation of education interventions."

Due: March 7, 2019

Russell Sage Foundation Small Grants in Computational Social Science (CSS)

"RSF offers small grants to doctoral students at the dissertation stage and recent Ph.D. recipients to support innovative, high-quality research and to encourage young investigators to enter these developing interdisciplinary fields. Small grants are currently offered under the Foundation’s program in Behavioral Economics and its special initiative in Computational Social Science.

Projects must contribute to RSF's mission to improve social and living conditions in the United States. Appropriate projects must demonstrate use of relevant theory, data, methods and measures in the research design. In all cases, proposed projects must address research issues that are relevant to the Foundation’s core programs in Social, Political, and Economic Inequality; Behavioral Economics; Future of Work; or Race, Ethnicity and Immigration."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: March 15, 2019

Post-Doctoral Summer Travel Grants

"Post-Doctoral Summer Travel Grants to scholars in the social sciences and humanities for travel to Turkey to carry out research projects. Normally, the recipients of these grants are expected to spend a minimum of four weeks in Turkey. Maximum award is round-trip airfare to Turkey. Only applicants who have completed their Ph.D.s in the last five years will be considered as 'post-doctoral' fellows. The Institute of Turkish Studies (ITS) is a non-profit, private educational institution devoted solely to the advancement of training, research, and teaching in the field of Ottoman and modern Turkish Studies. ITS was established in 1983 and is currently located at the School of Foreign Service of Georgetown University in Washington, DC. The Institute is governed by a twelve-member Board of Governors whose members include prominent US scholars in Ottoman and modern Turkish Studies, and others with a demonstrated interest in Turkey."

Due: March 29, 2019

Fahs-Beck Fund for Research and Experimentation Faculty/Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Mental Health Research

"Ffnd is accepting applications for behavioral or psychological research studies in the United States or Canada. They will award grants of up to $20,000 in support of studies designed to develop, refine, evaluate, or disseminate innovative interventions designed to prevent or ameliorate major social, psychological, behavioral, or public health problems affecting children, adults, couples, families, or communities. The Fund will also consider studies that have the potential for adding significantly to knowledge about such problems. Projects must focus on populations in the United States or Canada, or on a comparison between the U.S. or Canada and one or more other country."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due April 1, 2019

Behavioral Interventions Scholars

"The Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) anticipates soliciting applications for Behavioral Interventions Scholars grants to support dissertation research by advanced graduate students who are using approaches grounded in behavioral science or behavioral economics to examine specific research questions of relevance to social services programs and policies. These grants are meant to build capacity in the research field to apply a behavioral science or behavioral economics lens to issues facing poor and vulnerable families in the United States, and to foster mentoring relationships between faculty members and high-quality doctoral students. Applicants will be required to demonstrate the applicability of their research to practice or policy serving low-income children, adults, and families, especially those that seek to improve their well-being. Specific topics of interest may be delineated in the full funding opportunity announcement... Applicants will be required to submit a letter of support from the graduate student's mentor, acting as the project's Principal Investigator, that approves the application and provides a description of how the mentor will regularly monitor the student's work."

Estimated due date: April 14, 2019

Community Collaborations to Strengthen and Preserve Families

"The purpose of this funding opportunity is to fund cooperative agreements that support the development, implementation, and evaluation of strategies that prevent child maltreatment, reduce entry into the public child welfare system, and enhance the overall well-being outcomes of children and families. Funding will be used to improve the safety and stability of all families and reinforce supportive, nurturing relationships by: enhancing the capacity of communities to offer broad-based family supports; using data to inform and align strategies across sectors to address site specific barriers; supporting strategic collaborations with traditional family serving agencies and non-traditional partners; and coordinating, monitoring, and reporting on strategies and outcomes across multi-sector partners. The project period is for 5 years."

Due: May 3, 2019 11:59 ET

Russell Sage Foundation Social Inequality

"The Russell Sage Foundation's program on Social Inequality supports innovative research on whether rising economic inequality has affected social, political, and economic institutions, and the extent to which increased inequality has affected equality of opportunity, social mobility, and the intergenerational transmission of advantage. We seek investigator-initiated research projects that will broaden our understanding of the causes and consequences of rising economic inequalities in the United States."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Letter of Inquiry Due: May 23, 2019
 

Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE)

Anticipated RFP Announcement: April/May 2019

Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission - Institutional Grant

"The Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission is the chief instrument of the United States Government for maintaining expertise on Japan throughout U.S. academic and professional institutions. In this capacity, the Commission serves to make grants, and operates its institutional grant-making activities in four areas: Exchanges and Scholarship; Global Challenges; Arts and Culture; and Education and Public Affairs."

This grant is available to not-for profit entities only.  You must work through the foundation to apply.  Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

The Science of Learning

"The Science of Learning program supports potentially transformative basic research to advance the science of learning. The goals of the SL Program are to develop basic theoretical insights and fundamental knowledge about learning principles, processes and constraints. Projects that are integrative and/or interdisciplinary may be especially valuable in moving basic understanding of learning forward but research with a single discipline or methodology is also appropriate if it addresses basic scientific questions in learning.   The possibility of developing connections between proposed research and specific scientific, technological, educational, and workforce challenges will be considered as valuable broader impacts, but are not necessarily central to the intellectual merit of proposed research. The program will support  research addressing learning in a wide range of domains at one or more levels of analysis including: molecular/cellular mechanisms; brain systems; cognitive affective, and behavioral processes; and social/cultural influences. The program supports a variety of methods including: experiments, field studies, surveys, secondary-data analyses, and modeling."

Due: July 10, 2019

Improving Undergraduate STEM Education: Education and Human Resources (IUSE: EHR)

"NSF places high value on educating students to be leaders and innovators in emerging and rapidly changing STEM fields as well as educating a scientifically literate populace. In pursuit of this goal, IUSE: EHR supports projects that have the potential to improve student learning in STEM through development of new curricular materials and methods of instruction, and development of new assessment tools to measure student learning. In addition to innovative work at the frontier of STEM education, this program also encourages replications of research studies at different types of institutions and with different student bodies to produce deeper knowledge about the effectiveness and transferability of findings.

IUSE: EHR also seeks to support projects that have high potential for broader societal impacts, including improved diversity of students and instructors participating in STEM education, professional development for instructors to ensure adoption of new and effective pedagogical techniques that meet the changing needs of students, and projects that promote institutional partnerships for collaborative research and development. IUSE: EHR especially welcomes proposals that will pair well with the efforts of NSF INCLUDES (https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/nsfincludes/index.jsp) to develop STEM talent from all sectors and groups in our society. Collaborations are encouraged between IUSE proposals and existing INCLUDES projects, provided the collaboration strengthens both projects.

For all the above objectives, the National Science Foundation invests primarily in evidence-based and evidence-generating approaches to understand and improve STEM learning and learning environments, improve the diversity of STEM students and majors, and prepare STEM majors for the workforce. In addition to contributing to STEM education in the host institution(s), proposals should have the promise of adding more broadly to our understanding of effective teaching and learning practices.

The IUSE: EHR program recognizes and respects the variety of discipline-specific challenges and opportunities facing STEM faculty as they strive to incorporate results from educational research into classroom practice and work with education research colleagues and social science scholars to advance our understanding of effective teaching and learning.

Toward these ends the program features two tracks: (1) Engaged Student Learning and (2) Institutional and Community Transformation. Two tiers of projects exist within each track: (i) Exploration and Design and (ii) Development and Implementation."

Due: September 30, 2019

Advancing Informal STEM Learning

"The Advancing Informal STEM Learning (AISL) program seeks to advance new approaches to and evidence-based understanding of the design and development of STEM learning opportunities for the public in informal environments; provide multiple pathways for broadening access to and engagement in STEM learning experiences; advance innovative research on and assessment of STEM learning in informal environments; and engage the public of all ages in learning STEM in informal environments.

The AISL program supports six types of projects: (1) Pilots and Feasibility Studies, (2) Research in Service to Practice, (3) Innovations in Development, (4) Broad Implementation, (5) Literature Reviews, Syntheses, or Meta-Analyses, and (6) Conferences.

AISL program investments should be of interest and utility to public audiences, informal STEM practitioners, and decision-makers. All proposals must articulate clear rationales describing why a project is primarily informal and how it adds value to the informal STEM learning community.

The products of AISL investments may include, but are not limited to, exhibitions and programs in museums, zoos, aquaria, botanic gardens/arboreta, planetariums, nature centers, parks, libraries, and other environments; science communication; after-school and out-of-school time (OST) programs; radio, television, film, or media programs or series; Do-It-Yourself (DIY)/maker initiatives; opportunities for the public to engage in research including crowd-sourcing and citizen science; on-line and other digital experiences (e.g., games, simulations, social media, mobile computing, distributed networks, and massive online open courses); and research findings that articulate what works, for whom, why, and in what contexts.

Given that almost any environment can support informal science learning, there is an opportunity to understand how learners can be supported to make bridges between what they learn in one setting and what they learn in another setting. Thus, projects may choose to include how informal learning practices connect with STEM-related frameworks and curricula, college and career readiness standards, or other educational settings."

Due: November 6, 2019

Discovery Research PreK-12 (DRK-12)

"The Discovery Research PreK-12 program (DRK-12) seeks to significantly enhance the learning and teaching of science, technology, engineering, mathematics and computer science (STEM) by preK-12 students and teachers, through research and development of STEM education innovations and approaches. Projects in the DRK-12 program build on fundamental research in STEM education and prior research and development efforts that provide theoretical and empirical justification for proposed projects. Projects should result in research-informed and field-tested outcomes and products that inform teaching and learning. Teachers and students who participate in DRK-12 studies are expected to enhance their understanding and use of STEM content, practices and skills.

The DRK-12 program invites proposals that address immediate challenges that are facing preK-12 STEM education as well as those that anticipate radically different structures and functions of preK-12 teaching and learning. The DRK-12 program has three major research and development strands: (1) Assessment; (2) Learning; and (3) Teaching. The program recognizes the synergy among the three strands and that there is some overlap and interdependence among them. However, proposals should identify a clear focus of the proposed research efforts (i.e., assessment, learning, or teaching) consistent with the proposal's main objectives and research questions. The program supports six types of projects: (1) Exploratory, (2) Design and Development, (3) Impact, (4) Implementation and Improvement, (5) Syntheses, and (6) Conferences. All six types of projects apply to each of the three DRK-12 program strands."

Due: November 13, 2019

Amgen Foundation Grants

"The Amgen Foundation seeks to advance excellence in science education to inspire the next generation of innovators, and invest in strengthening communities where Amgen staff members live and work. The Amgen Foundation carefully considers each grant application it receives, seeking out diverse organizations whose philosophies, objectives and approaches align with the Foundation goals and mission. The Foundation awards grants to local, regional, and international nonprofit organizations that are replicable, scalable and designed to have a lasting and meaningful effect in our communities. Grants should reflect Amgen's dedication to impacting lives in inspiring and innovative ways. Amgen Foundation grants range from $10,000 to multi-million dollar commitments...

- Science Education

The Foundation is committed to raising the value of science literacy on a national and local level. The areas given priority consideration within science education are:

  • Teacher quality and professional development in math and science: Comprehensive programs that enhance the quality of math and science teachers entering the classroom, and support teachers with meaningful professional-development opportunities that have a positive impact on student achievement
  • Pivotal hands-on science experience: Support programs that provide students and teachers with opportunities for hands-on, inquiry-based learning experiences that significantly impact students' excitement about science and scientific careers"

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Rolling Deadline

Anderson-Rogers Foundation Social and Environmental Needs Grants

"The Anderson-Rogers Foundation makes grants to 501(c)(3) organizations that address a variety of social and environmental needs. The Foundation is particularly interested in funding programs in the following areas:
       - Reproductive and abortion rights
       - Access to contraception and sex education, particularly programs aimed at reducing teen pregnancy rates
       - Environmental education and activism, including programs to preserve and restore habitat and protect endangered
       animals
       - Promotion of environmentally sound agricultural practices and food systems
       - Promotion of humanist values and separation of church and state"

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Rolling Deadline

Laird Norton Foundation

"The Laird Norton Family Foundation awards grants in five program areas, which reflect family values and honor the family's commitment to environmental stewardship and ensuring excellence in generations to come.

  • Arts in Education - Increasing arts education and improving K-12 learning through the arts
  • Climate Change - Creating a healthy and productive environment for future and current generations through efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change
  • Global Fundamentals - Improving the quality of life in developing countries through clean water and sanitation access, technology, and policy
  • Sapling Fund - Engaging family members ages 14-21 in philanthropy and volunteerism
  • Watershed Stewardship - Making measurable improvements in the ecosystems of watersheds by investing in collaborative, community-led watershed restoration planning, prioritization, and adaptive management"

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Rolling Deadline

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Evidence for Action: Investigator-Initiated Research to Build a Culture of Health

"Evidence for Action (E4A), a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, funds research that expands the evidence base needed to build a Culture of Health. Our mission is to support rigorously designed quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research that yields convincing findings regarding the population health, well-being, and equity impacts of specific policies, programs and partnerships. We are especially interested in research examining the health impacts of programmatic or policy interventions that address factors outside the domain of health care services or public health practice."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Rolling Deadline

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Pioneering Ideas

"The goal of the Pioneering Ideas Brief Proposal funding opportunity is to explore; to look into the future and put health first as we design for changes in how we live, learn, work and play; to wade into uncharted territory in order to better understand what new trends, opportunities and breakthrough ideas can enable everyone in America to live the healthiest life possible.
While improving the status quo is vital to the health and well-being of millions of Americans now, the Pioneering Ideas Brief Proposal opportunity reaches beyond incremental changes to explore the ideas and trends that will influence the trajectory and future of health. Ultimately, we support work that will help us learn what a Culture of Health can look like—and how we can get there."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Rolling Deadline

Smith Richardson Foundation Domestic Public Policy Program

“The Domestic Public Policy Program supports projects that will help the public and policy makers understand and address critical challenges facing the United States. To that end, the Foundation supports research on and evaluation of existing public policies and programs, as well as projects that inject new ideas into public debates. ”
Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Rolling Deadline

Teagle Foundation Education in American Civil Life

"The mission of the Teagle Foundation is to support and strengthen liberal arts education, which it sees as fundamental to meaningful work, effective citizenship, and a fulfilling life. To that end, the foundation's Education in American Civic Life initiative supports faculty-led efforts to prepare graduates to become informed and engaged participants in the civic life of their local, national, and global communities. Through the initiative, the foundation seeks ambitious projects that address gaps in the civic knowledge of undergraduates and prepares them for the intellectual demands of democratic participation. Successful proposals will seek to promote learning about the formation of the American republic, the crafting of its Constitution, the history of contention over the meanings of the Constitution, the development of representative political structures, and the principles of democracy. The foundation encourages a comparative approach to studying these principles that will deepen students' understanding of what is unique about American institutions by placing them in contrast to the principles and institutions of other societies."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Rolling Deadline