Calls for Proposals

 

Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (OESE): Education Innovation and Research (EIR) Program

"The EIR program, established under section 4611 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as amended (ESEA), provides funding to create, develop, implement, replicate, or take to scale entrepreneurial, evidence-based, field- initiated innovations to improve student achievement and attainment for high- need students; and rigorously evaluate such innovations. The EIR program is designed to generate and validate solutions to persistent education challenges and to support the expansion of those solutions to serve substantially larger numbers of students. The central design element of the EIR program is its multi-tier structure that links the amount of funding an applicant may receive to the quality of the evidence supporting the efficacy of the proposed project, with the expectation that projects that build this evidence will advance through EIR’s grant tiers: ‘‘Early-phase,’’ ‘‘Mid-phase,’’ and ‘‘Expansion.’’ Applicants proposing innovative practices that are supported by limited evidence can receive relatively small grants to support the development, implementation, and initial evaluation of the practices; applicants proposing practices supported by evidence from rigorous evaluations, such as an experimental study (as defined in this notice), can receive larger grant awards to support expansion across the country. This structure provides incentives for applicants to: (1) Explore new ways of addressing persistent challenges that other educators can build on and learn from; (2) build evidence of effectiveness of their practices; and (3) replicate and scale successful practices in new schools, districts, and States while addressing the barriers to scale, such as cost structures and implementation fidelity..."

NOI Due: February 21, 2019

Cultivating Cultures for Ethical STEM (CCE STEM)

"Cultivating Cultures for Ethical STEM (CCE STEM) funds research projects that identify (1) factors that are effective in the formation of ethical STEM researchers and (2) approaches to developing those factors in all the fields of science and engineering that NSF supports. CCE STEM solicits proposals for research that explores the following: ‘What constitutes responsible conduct for research (RCR), and which cultural and institutional contexts promote ethical STEM research and practice and why?'  Factors one might consider include:  honor codes,  professional ethics codes and licensing requirements, an ethic of service and/or service learning, life-long learning requirements,  curricula or memberships in organizations (e.g. Engineers without Borders) that stress responsible conduct for research,  institutions that  serve  under-represented groups,  institutions where academic and research integrity are cultivated at multiple levels,  institutions that cultivate ethics across the curriculum, or programs that promote group work, or do not grade.  Do certain labs have a ‘culture of academic integrity'? What practices contribute to the establishment and maintenance of ethical cultures and how can these practices be transferred, extended to, and integrated into other research and learning settings?"

Due: February 22, 2019

FY 2019 Youth Leadership Program with Burma

"The Office of Citizen Exchanges, Youth Programs Division, of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs announces an open competition for the Youth Leadership Program with Burma. Public and private non-profit organizations meeting the provisions described in Internal Revenue Code section 26 USC 501(c)(3) may submit proposals to conduct a four-week U.S.-based exchange program for teenagers and adult educators. Participants will be high-school-aged youth and adult educators. Applicants should plan to provide U.S.-based programming for 17-18 youth and 2-3 adult participants from Burma. The activities for each program will focus on civic education, community engagement, diversity, and leadership and prepare participants to conduct projects at home that serve a community need."

Due: February 25, 2019

Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (OESE): Competitive Grants for State Assessments Program

"The purpose of the Competitive Grants for State Assessments program is to enhance the quality of assessment instruments and assessment systems used by States for measuring the academic achievement of elementary and secondary school students.

 This competition includes six absolute priorities and two invitational priorities.

  • Absolute Priority 1: Developing or improving assessments for English learners, including assessments of English language proficiency as required under section 1111(b)(2)(G) of the ESEA and academic assessments in languages other than English to meet the State’s obligations under section 1111(b)(2)(F) of the ESEA.
  • Absolute Priority 2: Developing or improving models to measure and assess student progress or student growth on State assessments under section 1111(b)(2) of the ESEA and other assessments not required under section 1111(b)(2) of the ESEA.
  • Absolute Priority 3: Developing or improving assessments for children with disabilities, including alternate assessments aligned to alternate academic achievement standards for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities described in section 1111(b)(2)(D) of the ESEA, and using the principles of universal design for learning.
  • Absolute Priority 4: Allowing for collaboration with institutions of higher education, other research institutions, or other organizations to improve the quality, validity, and reliability of State academic assessments beyond the requirements for such assessments described in section 1111(b)(2) of the ESEA.
  • Absolute Priority 5: Measuring student academic achievement using multiple measures of student academic achievement from multiple sources.
  • Absolute Priority 6: Evaluating student academic achievement through the development of comprehensive academic assessment instruments (such as performance and technology-based academic assessments, computer adaptive assessments, projects, or extended performance task assessments) that emphasize the mastery of standards and aligned competencies in a competency-based education model.
  • Promoting Literacy. Projects that are designed to address facilitating the accurate and timely use of data by educators to improve reading instruction and make informed decisions about how to help children or students build literacy skills while protecting student and family privacy.
  • Promoting Science, Technology, Engineering, or Math (STEM) Education, With a Particular Focus on Computer Science. Projects designed to improve student achievement or other educational outcomes in one or more of the following areas: Science, technology, engineering, math, or computer science (as defined in this notice)"

LOI due: February 27, 2019

American Psychological Association Esther Katz Rosen Fund Grants

"The Esther Katz Rosen Fund was established in 1974 by a generous bequest intended to support “…activities related to the advancement and application of knowledge about gifted children.”

Rosen Fund grants:
       - Enable and enhance development of identified gifted and talented children and adolescents.
       - Encourage promising psychologists to continue innovative research and programs in this area.

Support will be provided for activities on the advancement and application of knowledge related to identified gifted and talented children and adolescents, such as:
       - Research
       - Pilot projects
       - Research-based programs"

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: March 1, 2019

Science, Technology, Innovation, and Partnerships in Higher Education Program

“USAID has a long history of engaging higher education institutions (HEIs) to achieve development objectives. Together with HEIs, the U.S. Global Development Lab partners with USAID colleagues, other federal agencies, NGOs, and the private sector to increase the scientific knowledge and evidence directed toward addressing USAID’s development priorities and improving policy and programming decisions.”

Due: March 4, 2019

Institute of Education Sciences - Unsolicited Grant Opportunities

"The Institute of Education Sciences (the Institute) will consider unsolicited applications for research, evaluation, and statistics projects that would make significant contributions to the mission of the organization. Our mission is to expand fundamental knowledge and understanding of education and to provide parents, education leaders and practitioners, researchers, and the general public with unbiased, reliable, and useful information about the condition and progress of education in the United States; about education policies, programs, and practices that support learning, improve academic achievement, and increase access to education opportunities for all students; and about the effectiveness of Federal and other education programs. In addition, in order to incentivize researchers to meet higher standards for their work, we are developing Standards for Excellence in Education Research (SEER), which will reward several tiers of research quality. As appropriate to the type of project proposed and the status of SEER development at the time of application submission, we expect applicants to address as many SEER domains and questions as possible.

Under this announcement, we will consider applications for projects that are not eligible under our FY2019 grant competitions, both open and closed, described at https://ies.ed.gov/funding/. The applicant must demonstrate that the project was not eligible under one of our FY2019 grant competitions. In addition, we do not provide funds for projects that consist solely of program delivery or the provision of services to students. Activities supported by the Institute must be relevant to U.S. schools.

The National Center for Education Research did not hold the Research Training Programs in the Education Sciences competition (CFDA Number: 84.305B) in FY 2019, and we will not consider applications under this unsolicited announcement that in prior years would have been eligible under that competition.

We use a two-stage process to consider unsolicited grant applications. 1. If you are interested in this opportunity, submit a short prospectus. We will evaluate the prospectus to determine if it meets the eligibility requirements and if the proposed project would make a significant contribution to the organizations overall mission. 2. If we decide to consider the project further, you will submit a full proposal using the forms and format applicable to our regular research competitions. We will send the full proposal out for external peer review."

Due: March 6, 2019

Institute of Education Sciences (IES): Low-Cost, Short-Duration Evaluation of Education Interventions

"Purpose of Program: In awarding these grants, the Institute of Education Sciences (Institute) intends to provide national leadership in expanding fundamental knowledge and understanding of (1) developmental and school readiness outcomes for infants and toddlers with or at risk for a disability, (2) education outcomes for all students from early childhood education through postsecondary and adult education, and (3) employment and wage outcomes when relevant (such as for students who engaged in career and technical, postsecondary, or adult education). The Institute's research grant programs are designed to provide interested individuals and the general public with reliable and valid information about education practices that support learning and improve academic achievement and access to education opportunities for all students. These interested individuals include parents, educators, students, researchers, and policymakers. In carrying out its grant programs, the Institute provides support for programs of research in areas of demonstrated national need...

Under this competition, NCER will consider only applications that address low-cost, short-duration evaluation of education interventions."

Due: March 7, 2019

Autism Speaks Adult Transition Research Grants

This RFA invites applications with the aim of establishing evidence-based scalable practices leading to improved postsecondary employment, education, community living and other key outcomes relevant to adolescents and young adults with ASD.

Due: March 13, 2019

Mitsubishi Corporation Foundation for the Americas Environmental Education, Justice, Conservation, and Development Grants

"We promote the conservation of biological diversity and natural resources by supporting research, the establishment of protected areas, and strategies for valuing the natural environment such as Payments for Ecosystem Services.

We support environmental education programs that raise public awareness about the environment, and foster greater appreciation for the value and scarcity of natural resources, and the importance of environmental stewardship.

We promote environmental justice by supporting the rights of marginalized communities to live in a clean and safe environment and participate in decision-making that impacts their environment. This helps to ensure that the burdens of industrial development are not unfairly imposed on those communities that are the most vulnerable to negative environmental impacts.

We support sustainable development by means of local livelihood development for communities in environmentally sensitive areas, support for small and medium size enterprises in developing countries, and by promoting sustainable business practices.

Awarded grants generally range from $25,000 to $100,000."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: March 15, 2019

Russell Sage Foundation Small Grants in Computational Social Science (CSS)

"RSF offers small grants to doctoral students at the dissertation stage and recent Ph.D. recipients to support innovative, high-quality research and to encourage young investigators to enter these developing interdisciplinary fields. Small grants are currently offered under the Foundation’s program in Behavioral Economics and its special initiative in Computational Social Science.

Projects must contribute to RSF's mission to improve social and living conditions in the United States. Appropriate projects must demonstrate use of relevant theory, data, methods and measures in the research design. In all cases, proposed projects must address research issues that are relevant to the Foundation’s core programs in Social, Political, and Economic Inequality; Behavioral Economics; Future of Work; or Race, Ethnicity and Immigration."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: March 15, 2019

Office of Postsecondary Education (OPE): Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad (GPA)

"The purpose of the Fulbright-Hays GPA Program is to promote, improve, and develop modern foreign languages and area studies at varying levels of education. The program provides opportunities for faculty, teachers, and undergraduate and graduate students to conduct individual and group projects overseas to carry out research and study in the fields of modern foreign languages and area studies...

There are three types of GPA short- term projects: (1) Short-term seminar projects of four to six weeks in length designed to help integrate international studies into an institution’s or school system’s general curriculum by focusing on a particular aspect of area study, such as the culture of an area or country of study (34 CFR 664.11); (2) curriculum development projects of four to eight weeks in length that provide participants an opportunity to acquire resource materials for curriculum development in modern foreign language and area studies for use and dissemination in the United States (34 CFR 664.12); and (3) group research or study projects of three to twelve months in duration designed to give participants the opportunity to undertake research or study in a foreign country (34 CFR 664.13).

GPA long-term projects are advanced overseas intensive language projects that may be carried out during a full year, an academic year, a semester, a trimester, a quarter, or a summer. GPA long-term projects are designed to take advantage of the opportunities that exist in the foreign country for intensive advanced language training and for using the language while experiencing the culture in the foreign country. Participants should have successfully completed at least two academic years of training in the language to be studied in order to be eligible to participate in a GPA intensive advanced language training program. In addition, the language to be studied must be indigenous to the host country and maximum use must be made of local institutions and personnel (34 CFR 664.14)."

Due: March 25, 2019

Office of Postsecondary Education (OPE): Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship Program

"The Fulbright- Hays DDRA Fellowship Program provides opportunities to doctoral candidates to engage in dissertation research abroad in modern foreign
languages and area studies. The program is designed to contribute to the development and improvement of the study of modern foreign languages and area studies in the United States. This notice relates to the approved information collection under OMB control number 1840–0005."

Due: March 25, 2019

Post-Doctoral Summer Travel Grants

"Post-Doctoral Summer Travel Grants to scholars in the social sciences and humanities for travel to Turkey to carry out research projects. Normally, the recipients of these grants are expected to spend a minimum of four weeks in Turkey. Maximum award is round-trip airfare to Turkey. Only applicants who have completed their Ph.D.s in the last five years will be considered as 'post-doctoral' fellows. The Institute of Turkish Studies (ITS) is a non-profit, private educational institution devoted solely to the advancement of training, research, and teaching in the field of Ottoman and modern Turkish Studies. ITS was established in 1983 and is currently located at the School of Foreign Service of Georgetown University in Washington, DC. The Institute is governed by a twelve-member Board of Governors whose members include prominent US scholars in Ottoman and modern Turkish Studies, and others with a demonstrated interest in Turkey."

Due: March 29, 2019

Chambers Family Foundation Grants

"The foundation awards grants to residents and organizations throughout Oregon's Lane, Benton and Deschutes counties -- building stronger communities through the support of arts, education, medical, health, and human needs."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: March 31, 2019

Brady Education Foundation Existing Program Evaluation Grants

"Primary goal
       - What works: Evaluate the effectiveness of programs designed to promote positive cognitive and/or achievement outcomes
       for children (birth through 18 years) from underserved groups and/or low-resourced communities (minority ethnic groups,
       low-income families).

Secondary goals may include:
       - What works for whom, under what conditions: Investigate variations in program effects; that is, test for moderation effects
       that inform whether program effects are stronger for certain groups and/or under certain conditions than other groups or
       conditions.
      
       - Reasons for effects: Investigate mechanisms through which effects occur; that is, test for mediation effects that inform why
       the program is effective.

       - Cost-benefit analyses: Compare the total costs of the program with its estimated monetary benefits to determine the net
       cost or benefit associated with the program.

Awarded grants generally range from $50,000 to $200,000"

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: April 1, 2019

Fahs-Beck Fund for Research and Experimentation Faculty/Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Mental Health Research

"Ffnd is accepting applications for behavioral or psychological research studies in the United States or Canada. They will award grants of up to $20,000 in support of studies designed to develop, refine, evaluate, or disseminate innovative interventions designed to prevent or ameliorate major social, psychological, behavioral, or public health problems affecting children, adults, couples, families, or communities. The Fund will also consider studies that have the potential for adding significantly to knowledge about such problems. Projects must focus on populations in the United States or Canada, or on a comparison between the U.S. or Canada and one or more other country."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: April 1, 2019
 

Behavioral Interventions Scholars

"The Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) anticipates soliciting applications for Behavioral Interventions Scholars grants to support dissertation research by advanced graduate students who are using approaches grounded in behavioral science or behavioral economics to examine specific research questions of relevance to social services programs and policies. These grants are meant to build capacity in the research field to apply a behavioral science or behavioral economics lens to issues facing poor and vulnerable families in the United States, and to foster mentoring relationships between faculty members and high-quality doctoral students. Applicants will be required to demonstrate the applicability of their research to practice or policy serving low-income children, adults, and families, especially those that seek to improve their well-being. Specific topics of interest may be delineated in the full funding opportunity announcement... Applicants will be required to submit a letter of support from the graduate student's mentor, acting as the project's Principal Investigator, that approves the application and provides a description of how the mentor will regularly monitor the student's work."

Estimated due date: April 14, 2019

Learning Disabilities Foundation of America Grants

"Applications must be for projects which conform to the mission of the Learning Disabilities Foundation of America by responding to an unmet need in the field of learning disabilities. Funds are granted for charitable, scientific, literary or educational purposes or for the identification, ongoing evaluation, education of and services for children and adults with learning disabilities. Examples of project areas that fall within this philosophy:
- Innovative research into the causes, the prevention and/or the alleviation of learning disabilities
- Distinctive public awareness programs to advance public understanding of the needs of persons with learning disabilities
- Innovative programs to advance the achievement of persons with learning disabilities, increase the support skills of their families, support academic and professional advisors, and enhance the understanding of learning disabilities by their colleagues and employer."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: April 15, 2019

Hefferlin Foundation - Conference Support Grants

"The Education Committee will consider providing seed money to help underwrite the organizational costs of educational conferences that promote the basic principles of Science of Mind. Provide the following information via email or USPS postal mail to the contact persons listed below.

• Submit a written request for funds specifying the amount.
• Give detailed purpose of the conference, location, dates, proposed speakers, prospective audience, program, and budget.
• Include the name, address, phone number, cell phone, email address, and any other contact information of the sponsor.
• Send at least two written letters of reference."

Due: April 19, 2019

The Searle Freedom Trust Grant

"The Searle Freedom Trust was founded by Daniel C. Searle in 1998 to foster research and education on public policy issues that affect individual freedom and economic liberty. Through its grant-making, the foundation seeks to develop solutions to the countrys most important and challenging domestic policy issues. Recognizing that good policymaking relies on the availability of high-quality research, the foundation invests primarily in scholarship that results in the publication of books, journal articles, and policy papers. Funding is typically provided in the form of research grants, fellowships, and other types of targeted project support. The Searle Freedom Trust also provides funding for public interest litigation and supports outreach to the public through a variety of forums, including sponsorship of research conferences and seminars, film and journalism projects, and new media initiatives. With the foundations assistance, university and think tank scholars investigate a wide range of issues, including: Tax and budget policy Cost-benefit analysis of regulatory practices and proposals The workings of the legal system Environmental policy Social welfare reform K-12 and higher education policy The foundations board meets three times per year."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: April 22, 2019

Patrick and Anna M. Cudahy Fund Grant- Community Grants

"The Patrick and Anna M. Cudahy Fund has enjoyed active involvement in local, state, national and global communities, seeking new ways to effectively enhance common welfare. The Fund conducts most of its grantmaking throughout the state of Wisconsin and in the Chicago metropolitan area. However, a portion of the fund's annual grantmaking budget is allocated to discretionary grants in geographic areas across the United States and abroad reflecting the interests of Directors.

Funding Categories:

  • Social Services Services that provide safety nets and supports for under-resourced, low-income or otherwise marginalized communities. This includes programs that assist the homeless or those at risk of homelessness with immediate needs and/or future success; programs that provide help for marginalized communities such as veterans or people exiting the prison system; shelter/housing; food/anti-hunger programs; and employment programs.
  • Health and Human Services Support for programs that provide subsidized, low cost or free healthcare for the uninsured and under-insured of all ages; access to mental health; access to low or free-cost dental services; healthcare outreach programs; assistance for disabled individuals or other populations with specific challenges; and services for the elderly.
  • Environment Our interests are primarily focused on conservation efforts to protect wildlife, the preservation of natural areas and public interest environmental law.
  • Education Funding for exceptional early childhood, school age, high school, and college programs; after school programs; adult continuing education; and educational opportunities for adults who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. Our funding often goes toward scholarship programs so that low-income communities have access to the same high quality programs as their peers.
  • Arts and Culture Most grants are designated for arts/culture access for under-privilaged populations such as subsidized entry to museums or other cultural sites or events."

Due: May 1, 2019

Community Collaborations to Strengthen and Preserve Families

"The purpose of this funding opportunity is to fund cooperative agreements that support the development, implementation, and evaluation of strategies that prevent child maltreatment, reduce entry into the public child welfare system, and enhance the overall well-being outcomes of children and families. Funding will be used to improve the safety and stability of all families and reinforce supportive, nurturing relationships by: enhancing the capacity of communities to offer broad-based family supports; using data to inform and align strategies across sectors to address site specific barriers; supporting strategic collaborations with traditional family serving agencies and non-traditional partners; and coordinating, monitoring, and reporting on strategies and outcomes across multi-sector partners. The project period is for 5 years."

Due: May 3, 2019 11:59 ET

Russell Sage Foundation Social Inequality

"The Russell Sage Foundation's program on Social Inequality supports innovative research on whether rising economic inequality has affected social, political, and economic institutions, and the extent to which increased inequality has affected equality of opportunity, social mobility, and the intergenerational transmission of advantage. We seek investigator-initiated research projects that will broaden our understanding of the causes and consequences of rising economic inequalities in the United States."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Letter of Inquiry Due: May 23, 2019

Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE)

Anticipated RFP Announcement: April/May 2019

Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission - Institutional Grant

"The Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission is the chief instrument of the United States Government for maintaining expertise on Japan throughout U.S. academic and professional institutions. In this capacity, the Commission serves to make grants, and operates its institutional grant-making activities in four areas: Exchanges and Scholarship; Global Challenges; Arts and Culture; and Education and Public Affairs."

This grant is available to not-for profit entities only.  You must work through the foundation to apply.  Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: July 1, 2019

The Science of Learning

"The Science of Learning program supports potentially transformative basic research to advance the science of learning. The goals of the SL Program are to develop basic theoretical insights and fundamental knowledge about learning principles, processes and constraints. Projects that are integrative and/or interdisciplinary may be especially valuable in moving basic understanding of learning forward but research with a single discipline or methodology is also appropriate if it addresses basic scientific questions in learning.   The possibility of developing connections between proposed research and specific scientific, technological, educational, and workforce challenges will be considered as valuable broader impacts, but are not necessarily central to the intellectual merit of proposed research. The program will support  research addressing learning in a wide range of domains at one or more levels of analysis including: molecular/cellular mechanisms; brain systems; cognitive affective, and behavioral processes; and social/cultural influences. The program supports a variety of methods including: experiments, field studies, surveys, secondary-data analyses, and modeling."

Due: July 10, 2019

Developmental Sciences  (DS)

"DS supports basic research that increases our understanding of cognitive, linguistic, social, cultural, and biological processes related to human development across the lifespan. Research supported by this program will add to our knowledge of the underlying developmental processes that support social, cognitive, and behavioral functioning, thereby illuminating ways for individuals to live productive lives as members of society.

DS supports research that addresses developmental processes within the domains of cognitive, social, emotional, and motor development across the lifespan by working with any appropriate populations for the topics of interest including infants, children, adolescents, adults, and non-human animals. The program also supports research investigating factors that affect developmental change including family, peers, school, community, culture, media, physical, genetic, and epigenetic influences. Additional priorities include research that: incorporates multidisciplinary, multi-method, microgenetic, and longitudinal approaches; develops new methods, models, and theories for studying development; includes participants from a range of ethnicities, socioeconomic backgrounds, and cultures; and integrates different processes (e.g., memory, emotion, perception, cognition), levels of analysis (e.g., behavioral, social, neural), and time scales. 

The budgets and durations of supported projects vary widely and are greatly influenced by the nature of the project. Investigators should focus on innovative, potentially transformative research plans and then develop a budget to support those activities, rather than starting with a budget number and working up to that value.

While there are no specific rules about budget limitations, a typical project funded through the DS program is approximately 3 years in duration with a total cost budget, including both direct and indirect costs, between $100,000 and $200,000 per year. Interested applicants are urged to explore the NSF awards database for the DS program to review examples of awards that have been made.

The DS program also accepts proposals for workshops and small conferences. These typically have total cost budgets, including direct and indirect costs, of approximately $35,000.

 In addition to consulting the NSF awards database, it is often useful for interested applicants to submit (via email) a summary of no more than one page so that the Program Director can advise the investigator on the fit of the project for DS prior to preparation of a full proposal. New Investigators are encouraged to solicit assistance in the preparation of their project proposals via consultation with senior researchers in their area, pre-submission review by colleagues, and attendance at symposia and events at professional conferences geared towards educating investigators seeking federal funding."

Due: July 15, 2019

Science, Technology, and Society (STS)

"The Science, Technology, and Society (STS) program supports research that uses historical, philosophical, and social scientific methods to investigate the intellectual, material, and social facets of the scientific, technological, engineering and mathematical (STEM) disciplines. It encompasses a broad spectrum of STS topics including interdisciplinary studies of ethics, equity, governance, and policy issues that are closely related to STEM disciplines, including medical science. 

The program’s review process is approximately six months. It includes appraisal of proposals by ad hoc reviewers selected for their expertise and by an advisory panel that meets twice a year. The deadlines for the submission of proposals are February 2nd for proposals to be funded as early as July, and August 3rd for proposals to be funded in or after January. There is one exception: Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant proposals will have only one deadline per year, August 3rd.

The Program encourages potential investigators with questions as to whether their proposal fits the goals of the program to contact one of the program officers."

Due: August 5, 2019

The Searle Freedom Trust Grant

"The Searle Freedom Trust was founded by Daniel C. Searle in 1998 to foster research and education on public policy issues that affect individual freedom and economic liberty. Through its grant-making, the foundation seeks to develop solutions to the countrys most important and challenging domestic policy issues. Recognizing that good policymaking relies on the availability of high-quality research, the foundation invests primarily in scholarship that results in the publication of books, journal articles, and policy papers. Funding is typically provided in the form of research grants, fellowships, and other types of targeted project support. The Searle Freedom Trust also provides funding for public interest litigation and supports outreach to the public through a variety of forums, including sponsorship of research conferences and seminars, film and journalism projects, and new media initiatives. With the foundations assistance, university and think tank scholars investigate a wide range of issues, including: Tax and budget policy Cost-benefit analysis of regulatory practices and proposals The workings of the legal system Environmental policy Social welfare reform K-12 and higher education policy The foundations board meets three times per year."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Due: August 22, 2019

Hefferlin Foundation - Conference Support Grants

"The Education Committee will consider providing seed money to help underwrite the organizational costs of educational conferences that promote the basic principles of Science of Mind. Provide the following information via email or USPS postal mail to the contact persons listed below.

• Submit a written request for funds specifying the amount.
• Give detailed purpose of the conference, location, dates, proposed speakers, prospective audience, program, and budget.
• Include the name, address, phone number, cell phone, email address, and any other contact information of the sponsor.
• Send at least two written letters of reference."

Due: September 6, 2019

 

 

Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program

 

"The U.S. Fulbright Scholar Program offers nearly 470 teaching, research or combination teaching/research awards in over 125 countries. Opportunities are available for college and university faculty and administrators as well as for professionals, artists, journalists, scientists, lawyers, independent scholars and many others. In addition to several new program models designed to meet the changing needs of U.S. academics and professionals, Fulbright is offering more opportunities for flexible, multi-country grants."

Opportunities are available in a number of different educational interests including, English as a Foreign Language, STEM education, Education, Community College Administration, and more.

Due: September 16, 2019

 

Improving Undergraduate STEM Education: Education and Human Resources (IUSE: EHR)

 

"NSF places high value on educating students to be leaders and innovators in emerging and rapidly changing STEM fields as well as educating a scientifically literate populace. In pursuit of this goal, IUSE: EHR supports projects that have the potential to improve student learning in STEM through development of new curricular materials and methods of instruction, and development of new assessment tools to measure student learning. In addition to innovative work at the frontier of STEM education, this program also encourages replications of research studies at different types of institutions and with different student bodies to produce deeper knowledge about the effectiveness and transferability of findings.

IUSE: EHR also seeks to support projects that have high potential for broader societal impacts, including improved diversity of students and instructors participating in STEM education, professional development for instructors to ensure adoption of new and effective pedagogical techniques that meet the changing needs of students, and projects that promote institutional partnerships for collaborative research and development. IUSE: EHR especially welcomes proposals that will pair well with the efforts of NSF INCLUDES (https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/nsfincludes/index.jsp) to develop STEM talent from all sectors and groups in our society. Collaborations are encouraged between IUSE proposals and existing INCLUDES projects, provided the collaboration strengthens both projects.

For all the above objectives, the National Science Foundation invests primarily in evidence-based and evidence-generating approaches to understand and improve STEM learning and learning environments, improve the diversity of STEM students and majors, and prepare STEM majors for the workforce. In addition to contributing to STEM education in the host institution(s), proposals should have the promise of adding more broadly to our understanding of effective teaching and learning practices.

The IUSE: EHR program recognizes and respects the variety of discipline-specific challenges and opportunities facing STEM faculty as they strive to incorporate results from educational research into classroom practice and work with education research colleagues and social science scholars to advance our understanding of effective teaching and learning.

Toward these ends the program features two tracks: (1) Engaged Student Learning and (2) Institutional and Community Transformation. Two tiers of projects exist within each track: (i) Exploration and Design and (ii) Development and Implementation."

Due: September 30, 2019

Advancing Informal STEM Learning

"The Advancing Informal STEM Learning (AISL) program seeks to advance new approaches to and evidence-based understanding of the design and development of STEM learning opportunities for the public in informal environments; provide multiple pathways for broadening access to and engagement in STEM learning experiences; advance innovative research on and assessment of STEM learning in informal environments; and engage the public of all ages in learning STEM in informal environments.

The AISL program supports six types of projects: (1) Pilots and Feasibility Studies, (2) Research in Service to Practice, (3) Innovations in Development, (4) Broad Implementation, (5) Literature Reviews, Syntheses, or Meta-Analyses, and (6) Conferences.

AISL program investments should be of interest and utility to public audiences, informal STEM practitioners, and decision-makers. All proposals must articulate clear rationales describing why a project is primarily informal and how it adds value to the informal STEM learning community.

The products of AISL investments may include, but are not limited to, exhibitions and programs in museums, zoos, aquaria, botanic gardens/arboreta, planetariums, nature centers, parks, libraries, and other environments; science communication; after-school and out-of-school time (OST) programs; radio, television, film, or media programs or series; Do-It-Yourself (DIY)/maker initiatives; opportunities for the public to engage in research including crowd-sourcing and citizen science; on-line and other digital experiences (e.g., games, simulations, social media, mobile computing, distributed networks, and massive online open courses); and research findings that articulate what works, for whom, why, and in what contexts.

Given that almost any environment can support informal science learning, there is an opportunity to understand how learners can be supported to make bridges between what they learn in one setting and what they learn in another setting. Thus, projects may choose to include how informal learning practices connect with STEM-related frameworks and curricula, college and career readiness standards, or other educational settings."

Due: November 6, 2019

Discovery Research PreK-12 (DRK-12)

"The Discovery Research PreK-12 program (DRK-12) seeks to significantly enhance the learning and teaching of science, technology, engineering, mathematics and computer science (STEM) by preK-12 students and teachers, through research and development of STEM education innovations and approaches. Projects in the DRK-12 program build on fundamental research in STEM education and prior research and development efforts that provide theoretical and empirical justification for proposed projects. Projects should result in research-informed and field-tested outcomes and products that inform teaching and learning. Teachers and students who participate in DRK-12 studies are expected to enhance their understanding and use of STEM content, practices and skills.

The DRK-12 program invites proposals that address immediate challenges that are facing preK-12 STEM education as well as those that anticipate radically different structures and functions of preK-12 teaching and learning. The DRK-12 program has three major research and development strands: (1) Assessment; (2) Learning; and (3) Teaching. The program recognizes the synergy among the three strands and that there is some overlap and interdependence among them. However, proposals should identify a clear focus of the proposed research efforts (i.e., assessment, learning, or teaching) consistent with the proposal's main objectives and research questions. The program supports six types of projects: (1) Exploratory, (2) Design and Development, (3) Impact, (4) Implementation and Improvement, (5) Syntheses, and (6) Conferences. All six types of projects apply to each of the three DRK-12 program strands."

Due: November 13, 2019

Amgen Foundation Grants

"The Amgen Foundation seeks to advance excellence in science education to inspire the next generation of innovators, and invest in strengthening communities where Amgen staff members live and work. The Amgen Foundation carefully considers each grant application it receives, seeking out diverse organizations whose philosophies, objectives and approaches align with the Foundation goals and mission. The Foundation awards grants to local, regional, and international nonprofit organizations that are replicable, scalable and designed to have a lasting and meaningful effect in our communities. Grants should reflect Amgen's dedication to impacting lives in inspiring and innovative ways. Amgen Foundation grants range from $10,000 to multi-million dollar commitments...

- Science Education

The Foundation is committed to raising the value of science literacy on a national and local level. The areas given priority consideration within science education are:

  • Teacher quality and professional development in math and science: Comprehensive programs that enhance the quality of math and science teachers entering the classroom, and support teachers with meaningful professional-development opportunities that have a positive impact on student achievement
  • Pivotal hands-on science experience: Support programs that provide students and teachers with opportunities for hands-on, inquiry-based learning experiences that significantly impact students' excitement about science and scientific careers"

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Rolling Deadline

Anderson-Rogers Foundation Social and Environmental Needs Grants

"The Anderson-Rogers Foundation makes grants to 501(c)(3) organizations that address a variety of social and environmental needs. The Foundation is particularly interested in funding programs in the following areas:
       - Reproductive and abortion rights
       - Access to contraception and sex education, particularly programs aimed at reducing teen pregnancy rates
       - Environmental education and activism, including programs to preserve and restore habitat and protect endangered
       animals
       - Promotion of environmentally sound agricultural practices and food systems
       - Promotion of humanist values and separation of church and state"

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Rolling Deadline

Charles Koch Foundation - Graduate Research Support

"Graduate students are the next generation of scholars and teachers whose exploration of key questions will inform solutions to the challenges of the day and prepare the students of the future.

The Charles Koch Foundation seeks to connect students and scholars to the resources they need to explore these diverse ideas and solutions and welcomes research and travel grant proposals from  doctoral students. Proposals from all disciplines will be considered for funding."

Rolling Deadline

Laird Norton Foundation

"The Laird Norton Family Foundation awards grants in five program areas, which reflect family values and honor the family's commitment to environmental stewardship and ensuring excellence in generations to come.

  • Arts in Education - Increasing arts education and improving K-12 learning through the arts
  • Climate Change - Creating a healthy and productive environment for future and current generations through efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change
  • Global Fundamentals - Improving the quality of life in developing countries through clean water and sanitation access, technology, and policy
  • Sapling Fund - Engaging family members ages 14-21 in philanthropy and volunteerism
  • Watershed Stewardship - Making measurable improvements in the ecosystems of watersheds by investing in collaborative, community-led watershed restoration planning, prioritization, and adaptive management"

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Rolling Deadline

Research Interests of the United States Air Force Academy

"The USAFA invests in an active research program for three main reasons. First and foremost, research significantly enhances the cadet learning experience. Our research is done by, for and with cadets who work alongside fellow cadets and faculty mentors. Research provides cadets with rich independent learning opportunities as they tackle ill-defined problems and are challenged to apply their knowledge and abilities.

Second, our research program provides opportunities for essential faculty development.  Research broadens and deepens the experience base of the faculty.  This infuses current, relevant, state-of-the-art and cutting-edge applications and examples into the curriculum. This also helps our faculty remain current in their respective fields.

Third, at USAFA we strive to conduct research to enhance the ability of the Air Force to perform its mission. There are ongoing research projects spanning topics as diverse as super hypersonics, cyber security, spatial disorientation, athletic performance and homeland defense.

This BAA is located at the FedBizOpps.gov and Grants.gov website(s).  Research areas of interest to the USAFA’s Research Center Directors are described in detail in the sub-sections [of the full announcement, located in the related documents]."

Some areas of potential interest to College applicants are: Physics Education research, Science, Technology, Engineering & Math Outreach, Behavioral Sciences & Leadership, Foreign Languages and International Programs.

Rolling Deadline (white papers preferred as first submission)

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Evidence for Action: Investigator-Initiated Research to Build a Culture of Health

"Evidence for Action (E4A), a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, funds research that expands the evidence base needed to build a Culture of Health. Our mission is to support rigorously designed quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research that yields convincing findings regarding the population health, well-being, and equity impacts of specific policies, programs and partnerships. We are especially interested in research examining the health impacts of programmatic or policy interventions that address factors outside the domain of health care services or public health practice."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Rolling Deadline

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Pioneering Ideas

"The goal of the Pioneering Ideas Brief Proposal funding opportunity is to explore; to look into the future and put health first as we design for changes in how we live, learn, work and play; to wade into uncharted territory in order to better understand what new trends, opportunities and breakthrough ideas can enable everyone in America to live the healthiest life possible.
While improving the status quo is vital to the health and well-being of millions of Americans now, the Pioneering Ideas Brief Proposal opportunity reaches beyond incremental changes to explore the ideas and trends that will influence the trajectory and future of health. Ultimately, we support work that will help us learn what a Culture of Health can look like—and how we can get there."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Rolling Deadline

Smith Richardson Foundation Domestic Public Policy Program

“The Domestic Public Policy Program supports projects that will help the public and policy makers understand and address critical challenges facing the United States. To that end, the Foundation supports research on and evaluation of existing public policies and programs, as well as projects that inject new ideas into public debates. ”
Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Rolling Deadline

Teagle Foundation Education in American Civil Life

"The mission of the Teagle Foundation is to support and strengthen liberal arts education, which it sees as fundamental to meaningful work, effective citizenship, and a fulfilling life. To that end, the foundation's Education in American Civic Life initiative supports faculty-led efforts to prepare graduates to become informed and engaged participants in the civic life of their local, national, and global communities. Through the initiative, the foundation seeks ambitious projects that address gaps in the civic knowledge of undergraduates and prepares them for the intellectual demands of democratic participation. Successful proposals will seek to promote learning about the formation of the American republic, the crafting of its Constitution, the history of contention over the meanings of the Constitution, the development of representative political structures, and the principles of democracy. The foundation encourages a comparative approach to studying these principles that will deepen students' understanding of what is unique about American institutions by placing them in contrast to the principles and institutions of other societies."

Contact Aaron Shonk, Director, Foundation Services, for more information.

Rolling Deadline